The WildeBeat

The audio journal about getting into the wilderness.

 

ABOUT

The WildeBeat
Wilderness newsBeat

The outdoor recreation and adventure radio show and podcast about backcountry news and activities, like camping, backpacking, skiing, and snowshoeing. MORE...

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The WildeBeat is a public benefit project of the Earth Island Institute, a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation.

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RECOGNITION

The directories, review sites, or other podcasters listed below have recognized The WildeBeat for its quality of content and production.

As featured in an interview on the main page of
PodcastAlley.com Feeds

As featured in the June/July 2006 issue of the magazine
[Plenty Magazine]

[Podcast Bunker - 5 stars]

   

Sat, May 28, 2011

Update: What Became of The WildeBeat?

Posted at 09:00 /blog/news [link [Bookmark Link]]

This is a long overdue update. I appreciate the many e-mail and phone messages I've received asking me about the future of our work.

As producer and host, I'm still seeking the resources to re-launch regular production of The WildeBeat as a long-form show. I continue to post bits of news about wilderness policy and recreation issues on Twitter @WildeGeek and on FaceBook as The WildeBeat Podcast. We will continue to keep our three years of archives and 163 shows online.

For the full update, See more.

See more ...

Fri, Nov 07, 2008

Press Release: Format Change

Posted at 22:00 /blog/news [link [Bookmark Link]]

Steve made an announcement in an audio porogram yesterday about a change to our show schedule and format. You can download a PDF file of our press release, or read the text of it below.

See more ...

Thu, Nov 06, 2008

Announcement: A New Show

Posted at 23:00 /shows [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

This is a special announcement in place of our regular show.

Steve announces a change in our format and our production schedule. Our future programs will be presented in a longer format on roughly a monthly schedule. We expect to release the first in our new series of programs in December.


Thu, Oct 30, 2008

Update: Using All Fours, part 2

Posted at 09:00 /shows/skills [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[Ramp in biomechanics laboratory] This skills program is part 2 of our look at the science and skills, myths and fact around trekking poles. Is hiking with poles a trendy gimmick, or a valuable skill? (This is an update of our edition 87 originally presented on May 24, 2007.)

Julianne Abendroth-Smith talks about the results of research into the effects on the body of hiking with trekking poles. She's a biomechanics professor at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon.

We hear from Jayah Faye Paley, an author and educator, and co-host of an educational DVD, POLES for Hiking, Trekking & Walking. Jayah's web site, Adventure Buddies, provides more information about her educational products and services. Jayah describes basic skills for using trekking poles.

Julianne Abendroth-Smith updates us on the very latest scientific results about the effectiveness of trekking poles and the effects of using them.


Thu, Oct 23, 2008

Reprise: Using All Fours, part 1

Posted at 09:00 /shows/skills [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[Pole Hiker's silhouette] This skills program is part 1 of our look at the science and skills, myths and fact around trekking poles. Is hiking with poles a trendy gimmick, or a valuable skill? (This is a reprise of our edition 86 originally presented on May 17, 2007.)

Steve talks to Julianne Abendroth-Smith of Willamette University in Salem Oregon. She's a biomechanics professor studying the physics of hiking, and how hiking with various poles and walking sticks affect the body.

Steve talks to Jayah Faye Paley, an author and educator, and co-host of an educational DVD, POLES for Hiking, Trekking & Walking. Jayah's web site, Adventure Buddies, provides more information about her educational products and services.

We'll hear more from Julianne Abrendroth-Smith and Jayah Faye Paley in part two. We'll find out Jayah's techniques for using poles, and we'll update you with the latest scientific research about those techniques.


Thu, Oct 16, 2008

The New Rust Belt

Posted at 09:00 /shows/wild_places [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[Trees and the mountain pine beetle.] In this wild places program, Guest Correspondent Kurt Repanshek investigates the changes coming to the greater Yellowstone ecosystem.

Kurt explains how the mountain pine beetle is affecting the white bark pine trees, and man animals and people who depend on these trees. Why is this beetle a growing problem now?

We also hear from Dr. Jesse Logan, a recently retired U.S. Forest Service entomologist, Diana Tomback, a biology professor at the University of Colorado in Denver, and Louisa Willcox, a senior wildlife advocate for the Natural Resources Defense Council.

You can read more reporting by Kurt Repanshek at his National Parks Traveler web site.


Thu, Oct 09, 2008

Wild Shelters

Posted at 09:00 /shows/skills [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[A tule shelter.] This skills program presents skills for building primitive shelters. This is the fifth in a series featuring primitive technologies experts from Primitive Ways. Other shows in this series are edition 141, First Skills, edition 146, Starting with Fire, edition 150, Ancient Firemaking, and edition 155, Primal Grooming.

Using primitive tools and natural materials, naturalist Norm Kidder explains how to choose a sheltered location, demonstrates how to cut wood with a rock, and describes how to build a basic lean-to structure.

The Primitive Ways website has many articles on primitive shelter construction. Another source of information on primitive skills is the Society of Primitive Technologies.


Thu, Oct 02, 2008

Autumn Gear 2008

Posted at 09:00 /shows/gear [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[Backpack Gear Test] This gear program presents the first of our new series of gear reviews. Now, more than ever, our gear programs depend on your participation.

Steve talks to Backpack Gear Test founder and publisher Jerry Goller about the new relationship between Backpack Gear Test and the WildeBeat. Richard Lyon reviews the Ryders Eyewear Intersect sunglasses.

If you're interested in reviewing for Backpack Gear Test (BGT), read: How to become a tester. Manufacturers provide more gear than the volunteers at BGT can keep up with. By becoming a tester, you can help your fellow wilderness travelers find out what gear will work for them.


Thu, Sep 25, 2008

Keep Me Connected, part 2

Posted at 09:00 /shows/wild_places [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[Seeing mountains through a cell phone.]In part two of this wild places program, Assistant Producer Kate Taylor presents the pros and cons of using communication devices in the back-country, a topic that has sparked controversy among outdoor enthusiasts. (Here is part 1 of Keep Me Connected.)

Listeners respond to part one with their opinions and experiences using communication devices on wilderness trips. Derek Moore, SPOT LLC's manager of marketing and public relations, and Gregg Fauth, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park's wilderness manager, discuss the difference between a "challenge" and an emergency. Paul Magnanti and retired wilderness manager Laurel Boyers tell how they see a change in back-country use.


Thu, Sep 18, 2008

Keep Me Connected, part 1

Posted at 09:00 /shows/wild_places [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[City bars over nature.]In part one of this wild places program, Assistant Producer Kate Taylor presents the pros and cons of using communication devices in the back-country, a topic that has sparked controversy among outdoor enthusiasts.

Blogger Paul Magnanti shares an essay he wrote about the issue, and Derek Moore from SPOT LLC comments on his company's device, the SPOT Satellite Messenger. Gregg Fauth and Laurel Boyers, both wilderness managers of national parks, tell how communication technology has changed the wilderness experience.

To read Paul's essay and about his outdoor experiences, titled The Changing Culture of Connectivity, visit his blogsite at PMags.com.

Next week, in part 2, we'll hear more from Gregg Fauth and Paul Magnanti, and find out what types of situations warrant the use of communication devices in the back-country.


Thu, Sep 11, 2008

Primal Grooming

Posted at 09:00 /shows/skills [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[Primitive health and beauty aids.] This skills program presents primitive skills for personal grooming. This is the fourth in a series featuring primitive technologies experts from Primitive Ways. Other shows in this series are edition 141, First Skills, the edition 146, Starting with Fire, and edition 150, Ancient Firemaking.

Using primitive tools and natural materials, naturalist Sue Labiste demonstrates how to soap up, perform dental hygiene, and give yourself a manicure.

The Primitive Ways website has many articles on primitive health care and grooming. Another source of information on primitive skills is the Society of Primitive Technologies.


Thu, Sep 04, 2008

Sharing Wilderness

Posted at 09:00 /shows/skills [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[J.D. Tanner and Emily Ressler on a summit.] This skills program presents the Leave No Trace principle of Be Considerate of Other Visitors. This is the fourth and final edition in a series featuring the Leave No Trace traveling trainers.

We hear J.D. and Emily in several situations where someone didn't consider this seventh principle of Leave No Trace. J.D. and Emily summit a peak, encounter a cyclist on the trail, and try to get some sleep in a campsite.

Emily and J.D., along with the other Leave No Trace traveling trainers, maintain the Traveling Trainers Blog.

The music from the party in the adjacent campsite is Why don't you tell me by the band One Day Remains, available from the PodSafe Music Network.


Thu, Aug 28, 2008

Getting Oriented, part 2

Posted at 09:00 /shows/outings [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[A control checkpoint.] This outings program is part two of a look at the sport of orienteering. You'll win this race by getting lost the least often, because it's all about your navigation skills. Participating in orienteering events can significantly improve your backcountry navigation skills. (Part one is here.)

Steve attends an orienteering meet organized by the Bay Area Orienteering Club at California's China Camp State Park. Long-time club member Terri Ferrah explains the e-punch system used to track progress on an orienteering course. Tyler Atherton and his fellow Boy Scouts take off on a beginner (white-level) course. We hear from Mikkel Conradi, who designed the course and the map using O-CAD software. Erin Majors from Roseville, California, and Dana Koontz from Larkspur, California, talk about their experiences orienteering. Gary Kraght, a past president of the United States Orienteering Federation, sums up orienteering's wide appeal.

If you really want to master map and compass navigation in the wilderness, then orienteering is one of the best ways to learn. You can find a local club through the United States Orienteering Federation.

WildeBeat members can download a compete recording of Scott's 12-minute beginner's clinic from our WildeBeat Insider web pages.


Wed, Aug 27, 2008

Announcement: Renewed Relationship for Gear Reviews

Posted at 21:00 /blog/gear [link [Bookmark Link]]

The WildeBeat and BackpackGearTest (BGT) are redefining and strengthening our relationship in order to provide you more impartial gear reviews. This new relationship gives BGT more editorial control over our gear review editions.

Until now, the WildeBeat selected topics and BGT reviews for each gear review edition, grouping reviews of similar products. In future gear review editions, we'll present reviews of an assortment of products selected by BGT's moderators. The moderators will base these choices on the quality of the reviewers' testing and reporting, not necessarily on the qualities of the product.

Since the the WildeBeat was launched in 2005, gear reviews have been an important category of our programs. Steve wanted to provide listeners with impartial reviews. Independent from sponsors and advertisers, BGT could provide that impartiality, and could also benefit from the exposure the WildeBeat provides. So an understanding was arrived at that allowed Steve to regularly interview BGT testers. Steve's goal was to provide a wide range of opinions on a wide range of products.

BGT was created by Utah hiker Jerry Goller. Goller, according to About BackpackGearTest, "saw a need for impartial reviews in a world where most people got their information from publications that accepted money from the same manufacturers whose gear they were testing." He started a Yahoo group of hikers and backpackers willing to test and review gear. After successfully recruiting skilled reviewers and diverse manufacturers interested in receiving independent feedback about their products, the independent Web site, BackpackGearTest.org, was launched in August of 2002.

We plan to present the first of our new gear review editions at the end of September, with two shows each season. The new shows will typically feature fewer products that will be reviewed in more detail.

If you want to contribute gear reviews to the WildeBeat, you can do so by joining BGT. BGT is looking for qualified testers. To get qualified, you start out by writing reviews of gear you already own. After that, you could be offered free gear to review. Read: how to become a tester to find out more.

Thu, Aug 21, 2008

Getting Oriented, part 1

Posted at 09:00 /shows/outings [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[Orienteering map, compass, and a control bag.] This outings program is part one of a look at the sport of orienteering. You'll win this race by getting lost the least often, because it's all about your navigation skills. Participating in orienteering events can significantly improve your backcountry navigation skills.

Steve attends an orienteering meet organized by the Bay Area Orienteering Club at California's China Camp State Park. Gary Kraght, the vice president for club services of the United States Orienteering Federation explains what orienteering is, and its history. Scott Aster presents a beginner's clinic for first-time orienteers.

Next time, in part 2, we'll listen-in on the experience of orienteering.

WildeBeat members can download a compete recording of Scott's 12-minute beginner's clinic from our WildeBeat Insider web pages.


Thu, Aug 14, 2008

Summer OR 2008

Posted at 09:00 /shows/gear [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[Backpack Gear Test] This gear program is a report on the 2008 Outdoor Retailer's Summer Market. What gear will BackpackGearTest be reviewing for next summer?

Volunteers Rick Allnutt, Christopher Nicolai, and Ken Bigelow report on the most interesting gear they hope to test for BackpackGearTest.ORG. They comment on products by: GoMotion, Ultimate Survival Technologies, Gerber, Bushnell, Sigg, Insect Shield, and the Therm-a-Rest division of Cascade Designs.

If you're interested in reviewing for Backpack Gear Test (BGT), read: How to become a tester. Manufacturers provide more gear than the volunteers at BGT can keep up with. By becoming a tester, you can help your fellow wilderness travelers find out what gear will work for them.

WildeBeat Members can download the entire reports from the BGT testers from our WildeBeat Insider web pages.


Thu, Aug 07, 2008

Ancient Firemaking

Posted at 09:00 /shows/skills [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[Dino Labiste makes fire with a hand drill.] This skills program presents advanced skills for making fire without modern tools. This is the third in a series of shows featuring primitive technologies experts from Primitive Ways. (The first show is number 141, First Skills, and the second is show number 146, Starting with Fire.)

Naturalist Dino Labiste talks about the three methods prehistoric humans used to make fire. He demonstrates creating fire by friction using a hand drill. He talks about two other methods, fire by percussion, and fire by compression. He explains what would be the best of these techniques for you to use if you had no modern choices.

The Primitive Ways website has many articles on primitive fire skills. Another source of information on primitive skills is the Society of Primitive Technologies.

WildeBeat Members can download a recording of Dino Labiste's complete firemaking demonstration from our WildeBeat Insider web pages.


Thu, Jul 31, 2008

Waste Training

Posted at 09:00 /shows/skills [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[Don't litter in the wilderness.] This skills program presents a training talk and demonstration on disposing of waste properly in the backcountry. This is the third in a series of editions featuring the Leave No Trace traveling trainers.

Steve recorded J.D. Tanner and Emily Ressler giving their regular presentation of the third principle of Leave No Trace, Dispose of Waste Properly. This is an important skill that most people get, but fewer people seem to get right.

Emily and J.D., along with the other Leave No Trace traveling trainers, maintain the Traveling Trainers Blog.


Thu, Jul 24, 2008

Bagging Wild Sounds, part 2

Posted at 09:00 /shows/outings [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[Microphone comparison workshop] This outings program is part two of a report on a trip to record nature sounds. You've got to be totally quiet; stand like a statue. And then, if you're in the right place at the right time, you'll capture your sound. (Part one is here.)

Our assistant producer Kate Taylor reports on her visit to the annual field recording workshop of the Nature Sounds Society. She tells her story with the help of:

  • Alton Byrd, a nature sounds hobbyist from Berkeley, California.
  • Martyn Stewart, a professional nature sounds recordist for the BBC.
  • Chris Bell, a museum curator from Sydney, Australia.
  • Hundreds of birds, amphibians, and a few domesticated mammals.
  • Gina Farr, a multimedia producer from Marin Country, California.

You can get tips from Dan Dugan on recording nature sounds by listening to our edition number 90, Listening to Parks.

WildeBeat Members can download an extended interview with Martyn Stewart and additional extended wild sound recordings from WildeBeat Insider web pages.


Thu, Jul 17, 2008

Bagging Wild Sounds, part 1

Posted at 09:00 /shows/outings [link [Bookmark Link]]
Listen now:

[A microphone in the field.] This outings program is part one of a report on a trip to record nature sounds. You've got to be totally quiet; stand like a statue. And then, if you're in the right place at the right time, you'll capture your sound.

Our assistant producer Kate Taylor reports on her visit to the annual field recording workshop of the Nature Sounds Society. She tells her story with the help of:

  • Dan Dugan, technical advisor to the Nature Sounds Society.
  • Gina Farr, a multimedia producer from Marin Country, California.
  • Hundreds of birds, amphibians, and a few domesticated mammals.
  • Chris Bell, a museum curator from Sydney, Australia.
  • Martyn Stewart, a professional nature sounds recordist for the BBC.

Next week, in part two, we'll hear more nature sounds, and find out why it's important to our guests to record and preserve them.

You can get tips from Dan Dugan on recording nature sounds by listening to our edition number 90, Listening to Parks.



   

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